Coffee – the morning brew, the delectable first cup, coffee- Americans love it, European’s for the most part, think they own the best brews (especially in stuck up France!) -AND- this coffee maker, Cuisinart; has proven itself worth every penny! “Oh sure man, we’ve all heard that pennies pitch…” Nope, not this one you haven’t, and I guarantee you, there is no way that a coffee brewer should logically make such a difference, but it does. “Ok fine fella, you’re tellin’ me it’s great, but what about those pennies?” Not too bad – 100 pennies makes up a dollar, and this brewer of coffee magnificent only runs on average $80-90 U.S., so that’s how many pennies? Now that’s not bad when coffee gets you going, and it’s an important drink in your day, wouldn’t you say?

Perhaps you’re not a person who brand shops, going from store to store with your “I want more…” stapled to your wallet? Perhaps you have oodles and oodles of bucks, well that’s cool, this one is for you, but the person that we really want to interest here is a little more like us, month end comes but bills end seldom does- if that’s you, the price on this wonderful coffee brewer will do. We walked and talked much of two days several months ago, trying to find the coffee brewer that would do the trick; because my life partner Debbie loves her coffee- see, it wasn’t me (!)- Oh no. It was her – and that’s why I know that if you love your coffee, ’cause she surely does, this one will make your pot sparkle like the gold at the rainbow’s end!

Forget price (!), forget inexpensive, and let’s say that you had a fortune to spend on some really fancy, really silver or gold lined coffee makers, right? Let’s say that was the instance; my contention is that your brew wouldn’t taste better than this. Coffee isn’t my big drink, but this brewer makes it nice, keeps it warm, and does the pre-programmed wake up pot justice. Sold yet? If you are cool- quit torturing yourself, go get it, if you are still holding out, a real die-hard, this next paragraph is just for you, brew on.

First morning cup, it’s important, it makes the day start up, and it should taste great, but if you are anything like me, the past coffee makers have missed it, well this time you can count on that fresh brewed, no bitter (unless you put them in) after taste, first cup that makes you smile. The “Cuis” (pronounced “Queez” in our house) will make you glad you got it- and here’s the real kicker…you can get it online, never leave the house- just go to the corporate web site and order away…but better yet, and shamelessly plugged, you can get it off just about any site – why not try ours? In addition, you can tell us what you thought about it – [email protected]

Coffee cans are great for many other uses other than just toting coffee. This article will go over several different craft ideas and creative ways to reuse them.

If you have pets empty coffee cans make great scoops for dishing out their pet food. It works great for horses and chickens and indoor pets too. The smaller cans work great for the smaller pets who don’t eat as much and the larger ones work best for the larger animals who eat more food.

Empty coffee cans make great arts and crafts for the kids. For Valentine’s Day a coffee can makes a great Valentine’s Day card holder. The kids can decorate the can with paper and glue. With parents supervision they can spray paint them cool colors. Valentine’s stickers make great embellishments for the cans.

Okay, now this next idea may not work for you, because it is a noise maker, but empty coffee cans make great drums for toddlers. If you don’t want to use the tin coffee cans the plastic ones work great. If you don’t want them used as drums they also make great toys for the kids to play with. They can take toys in and out of the cans or stack them. This is a great way to reuse empty coffee cans.

Empty coffee cans make great accessories for your kitchen. You can decorate them to match the theme in your kitchen. You can spray paint them, use rub ons or stickers. You can use the empty can to put recipe cards, snacks, or use as an extra cannister.

Another great use for an empty coffee can is a desk organizer. It is a great holder for your pens, pencils, scissors, rulers, etc. The coffee can is great for this because it is a few sizes smaller than your average pencil holder. It can hold a lot more. You can decorate and embellish it anyway you like. This same idea would work great for your sewing or scrapbooking accessories too. This would be great in a garage or workshop.

A great gift idea would be to make an empty coffee can a flower pot. It is so easy to do! Spray paint or decorate the can as you like and then add some potting soil and a pretty flower or plant. Looks great! This would make a great Mother’s Day gift or gift for any occasion.

Empty coffee cans make great caddies for the bathroom. They are great to contain all of your hairbrushes, combs, picks, and other hair accessories. You can decorate the can as previously mentioned in the other ideas. It is also great for holding hair scrunchies, ponytail holders, hairbands, and barrettes.

A very creative idea to use an empty coffee can is to make a time capsule. You can make it for however long you wish. Add a newspaper, stamp, and other items you would like. You can plant in your yard to be dug up at a later date. Very fun!

As you can see, there are a lot of different creative ways you can reuse empty coffee cans. I have only touched on a few. With some imagination and thought you can come up with a lot more ideas on reusing empty coffee cans.

Coffee, that wonderful conduit for caffeine as well as keeping us warm on chilly days, had been around for centuries. Today it is a big business from mega chains (a Starbucks on almost every corner) to “mom and pop” places (Jitters in La Mesa, California). From one bunch of coffee beans, you can get a wide variety of flavors – it is all on how the beans are roasted. This article gives the eight most popular roasts that one can find at your local coffee house or grocery store. Be sure to check out our other post: Caribou Coffee Review

  1. American Roast: this roast is also known as an after dinner blend and intended to be enjoyed with desserts to help cut down on the desserts sweetness. This roast tends to be a darker roast with low acidity.
  2. American Roast: This is a light/medium road. Further this roast is traditionally used with coffee beans in North America and is still the most common choice today. There are two modifications of this roast: City Roast: which tends to lean towards a light brown; and Full City Roast: which tends to be dark brown with an oily drops/sheen and is also known as a “Brown Roast”.
  3. Cinnamon Roast: A very light roast that ends up dry. Most people feel that it is under-roasted. This roast will have a weak and grainy aroma while having a sour taste. This roast is used mostly with Peaberries (aka Caracoli – these are coffee beans that are just a single bean within the fruit. Only about five percent of all coffee produced will have this happen during growth) as they are handled differently during roasting.
  4. Dark Roast: The roast will be dark brown to almost black in color. This roast is more pungent in aroma and has less acidity than other roasts. The spectrum includes light dark which will have the maximum flavor and aroma while the full dark has no acidity, but has a distinct “burnt” flavor.
  5. French Roast: It is the darkest of the dark roast while still being palatable. It tends to very oily and is almost black without falling towards the burnt flavor. Even though is a dark roast, it tends to be light bodied with a pungent roasted flavor.
  6. Italian Roast: Another dark roasted coffee with a very dark brown color and oily surface. It is often confused with French Roast though it tends to have a bolder flavor and aroma.
  7. Medium Roast: This roast is medium brown in color and having a dry surface. It is similar to American Roast, though it is slightly darker and slightly more pronounced in flavor. This is another roast that tends to be popular in North America.
  8. Vienna Roast: This roast is the lightest of the dark roasts and more widely known as Fully City or Full Flavor holding the characteristics of the dark brown color and oily sheen as well as the full flavor.

It should be noted that when beans are under-roasted the coffee will be light in color or colorless and have an astringent taste while beans that have been over-roasted will have a bitter taste as well as a charcoal flavor. But, no matter how you prefer your coffee, it is all about the bean and its roast.

Keep your tea. Give me coffee any day, as Sydney Smith said, “If you want to improve your understanding, drink coffee; it is the intelligent beverage.”

Legend has it that an Ethiopian goat herder first recognized the magical powers of red coffee berries, when he noticed how frolicsome his goats became after eating them sometime around AD 800. He tried some, so the story goes, and the effect was so ecstatic, that he ran straight to the local priests with his discovery. They tried them and stayed up all night in rapture with the divine. The legend of coffee was born.

Although the truth of this story is controversial (some say that it was first brewed in Arabia circa AD 1000) we know that the magic beans didn’t leave Africa or Arabia until they were smuggled out nearly 600 years later. The first coffee arrived in Europe in 1615, and the rest as they say is history – although politics surrounding the spread of coffee were far from simple. Our ancestors recognized that coffee is more than ‘just’ a drink.

Fast-forward to the 21st Century and the same passions still emerge amongst those who, like me, are confirmed coffee drinkers. Instant doesn’t really count – it’s little more than flavoured water. But proper coffee made in a proper coffee pot; now that’s a different story. Cafetiere, filter, espresso machine – everyone has a favourite method. However, there is one drawback; good coffee takes time.

At home, the only reason that I make tea is lack of time. At work it gets a little more complicated – there’s that underlying assumption that you at least have to offer to make colleagues a drink. Fine if it’s tea or instant, but making real coffee for everyone else is often just a drag. As the smell pervades the room, it’s easy to feel like the office coffee machine as you fill the second cafetiere. Perhaps the effort required to prepare coffee makes it taste so good? I’d always assumed this and been rather scathing of any form of drink machine that claimed to make proper coffee. There’s no way that you can just push a button and get a decent drink – in fact I’d go so far as to say, that the only way to achieve effort free coffee is to get a friend, maid or butler to make it for you.

This conviction has just landed me right in it. Whilst waiting for a meeting I was offered the choice of fairtrade or decaf. Decaf goes against my religion, so I almost asked for tea when I saw that it was coming from a machine. After all, the words ‘instant’ and ‘coffee’ shouldn’t appear in the same sentence. But the drink I got didn’t taste like insipid dishwater; it was proper coffee.

In a brief moment, when I thought no one was looking, I tried to investigate the machine, looking for the trickery. Needless to say, my cheeks turned hot as freshly poured coffee when I was caught peering behind the machine. Explaining that I was looking for the ‘hidden butler’ really didn’t help…

How to Make the Perfect Cup of Coffee

It’s Not as Easy as Those Folger’s and Maxwell House Commercials Claim

Making a good cup of coffee is an art. Any barista at a good coffee bar (and I don’t mean Starbucks) can tell you that. You need the right ingredients, the right equipment, and you need to follow a few simple rules.

Let’s start with the ingredients. If you were baking a pound cake, you wouldn’t consider using bad eggs, rancid butter, or stale flour. Why, then, would you consider using tap water and old ground coffee in a can, if you want the best cup of coffee you can have? Now, if the “best part of waking up is Folger’s in your cup,” either stop right here and go back to the old grind (pun intended), or stay with me for a few minutes, and learn what you’ve been missing. It doesn’t have to take you a lot of time, and while it does cost a little more, the best cut of meat costs a little more than hamburger too.

Most people use tap water when they make coffee. A lot of those same people wouldn’t even consider actually drinking tap water, because of the chlorine added or the pollutants already in it in EPA “acceptable” standards. There’s a great rule when cooking with wine that says don’t cook with anything you wouldn’t drink. T

he same thing is true for water in making coffee. If you wouldn’t drink it, don’t try to hide it in your coffee. The easiest thing to do is get one of those handy filters that attaches to your faucet. Or, a filtering pitcher in your fridge. If all else fails, buy large bottles of pure spring water (and please recycle the container!). Just don’t use tap water. One other thing – the water you start with should be COLD. Not warm, not room temperature, not a little bit cool, but down-right cold.

Next, the coffee itself. The coffee you choose depends upon a lot of things. First, or maybe more properly next to last, there is the roast itself. Some people like a strong dark roast. Some like a lighter roast. By the way, the light roasts actually have more caffeine than dark roasts; the darker a roast is, the less caffeine it will contain.

Many people think it’s the other way around, but now you know better. Actually, coffee is usually in one of four categories: Light, Medium, Dark, and Very Dark. Espresso is a Very Dark coffee, but because it requires special brewing equipment, but I’m not going to deal with that in this article. I’m just talking about a good cup of coffee. Not anything that ends in -cino or has flavoring added to it, but good basic coffee.

A light roast should be a medium bodied coffee, with a mild flavor and a hint of a fragrance, such as fruity or spicy, that makes you want to drink it slowly, and savor a second cup of coffee. A medium roast should have a strong scent, and have the perfect balance of the three elements of coffee: acidity, aroma, and body. It should have a smooth taste with medium body, and just the right touch of acidity. Acidity in coffee is not the bitterness that most people think, the stuff that gives you heartburn. Acidity in coffee is often called a sharpness or brightness that keeps your coffee from tasting flat and dull. Aroma should be self-evident. Body, in coffee, refers to the consistency, as it does in wine.

A Cabernet wine may be called full-bodied; so is a dark roast. Most coffees that are called “Breakfast Blends” are medium roasts; more caffeine than a darker coffee, but a little less than the light roast. It can also be called regular or American coffee, or a city roast. A dark roast is an intense coffee, full-bodied with a pleasant but bittersweet undertone. Dark roasts include most Continental coffee, New Orleans coffee, and coffee referred to as a Vienna or Viennese roast. The very darkest roasts are generally French and Italian roasts, as well as Espresso. They are full-bodied and well-balanced, and like espresso, should have a bitter taste and/or aftertaste.

The source of the coffee, the soil it grew in, the amount of sun and rain it received while growing, all go into the flavor of what are called Varietals. They are coffees with one source of origin. The best known, and most expensive, varietal is Jamaican Blue Mountain. It goes for about $75 to $100 a pound right now, if you can get it. Every true coffee lover should try it at least once. It is expensive because of the unique growing conditions limited to a relatively very small area in Jamaica. It should have the perfect balance of body, aroma, and acidity, with a rich, full flavor, a touch of spiciness, and a hint of sweetness. It is most often found in blends in the U.S., which makes it more affordable, but if you really need to try the real thing. The other popularly identified varietal is Kona; while about half the price of Jamaican Blue Mountain, it is still expensive, and most often found in blends. Pure Kona will have a smooth texture, like black velvet with overtones of nuts and butter. It too is worth sampling in its pure form, before settling for a blend. As the name implies, it is grown only on the island of Kona, in Hawaii. One of the popular grocery store coffees advertises itself as “Pure Colombian;” Colombian coffee is a medium to full bodied coffee, with a rich and multi-layered flavor, and a clean, almost wine-like finish. Other popular varietals are Antigua, from Guatemala; Malabar, a blend of Indian-grown beans; Costa Rica, made from the round peaberry coffee grown in the volcanic soil of Costa Rica; Peruvian, a smooth light coffee, medium-bodies, with a faintly floral acidity and well-balanced undertones. Java, now actually a nickname for coffee, comes from the island of Java in

The other popularly identified varietal is Kona; while about half the price of Jamaican Blue Mountain, it is still expensive, and most often found in blends. Pure Kona will have a smooth texture, like black velvet with overtones of nuts and butter. It too is worth sampling in its pure form, before settling for a blend. As the name implies, it is grown only on the island of Kona, in Hawaii.

One of the popular grocery store coffees advertises itself as “Pure Colombian;” Colombian coffee is a medium to full bodied coffee, with a rich and multi-layered flavor, and a clean, almost wine-like finish. Other popular varietals are Antigua, from Guatemala; Malabar, a blend of Indian-grown beans; Costa Rica, made from the round peaberry coffee grown in the volcanic soil of Costa Rica; Peruvian, a smooth light coffee, medium-bodies, with a faintly floral acidity and well-balanced undertones. Java, now actually a nickname for coffee, comes from the island of Java in Indonesia, and is very full-bodied with a spicy, sweet acidity. All of the varietals are often blended, to make the perfect balance of elements, or to make a coffee that goes with a specific type of food. A sweeter coffee with a hint of spice goes well with dessert, for example. A full-bodied coffee roasted to a light roast makes a great breakfast blend. Many blends of varietals are

All of the varietals are often blended, to make the perfect balance of elements, or to make a coffee that goes with a specific type of food. A sweeter coffee with a hint of spice goes well with dessert, for example. A full-bodied coffee roasted to a light roast makes a great breakfast blend. Many blends of varietals are available, so that individual varieties can mingle with each other to form the perfect blend of aroma, acidity, and body. In a good coffee bar, the servers and baristas will be able to tell you about the coffee they sell both by the cup and by the bag. And check the bag; a good coffee will have the date it was roasted right on the bag. The more recently it was roasted, the better the coffee will be.

Which brings us to the second step: how do you best store your coffee? Despite what you may have been told, coffee should most definitely not be stored in your freezer or refrigerator. In the refrigerator it is apt to pick up flavors from other items it is stored with; I don’t know about you, but I don’t care for onion coffee. In the freezer it can get freezer burn, get “frost” if the humidity isn’t properly balanced, and in both places, it becomes unnecessarily cold. If you buy your coffee in a vacuum sealed bag, it is fine stored in a cupboard until the seal is broken. Once the seal is broken, it should be stored in a plastic or ceramic container with an airtight lid. And equally importantly, it should be stored as whole beans. While pre-ground coffee saves you a step, what you save in time, you lose in flavor. Coffee begins to lose its flavor as soon as it is ground. Recap: Buy whole-bean coffee in the roast and variety or blend of your choice, store it in

If you buy your coffee in a vacuum sealed bag, it is fine stored in a cupboard until the seal is broken. Once the seal is broken, it should be stored in a plastic or ceramic container with an airtight lid. And equally importantly, it should be stored as whole beans. While pre-ground coffee saves you a step, what you save in time, you lose in flavor. Coffee begins to lose its flavor as soon as it is ground. Recap: Buy whole-bean coffee in the roast and variety or blend of your choice, store it in airtight container until you are ready to use. Grind only as much as you want to use at that moment, and don’t grind it too fine. If it is powdery, it will be too bitter and possibly too strong. Ask your local barista to show you the coffee they put in the pot in their shop; try to match that grind at home. Not chunky, not powdery, but somewhere in between.

Now, for the equipment. Most drip coffee-pots are capable of making an excellent cup of coffee, but if you live alone, or are half of a couple that wants one, excellent cup of coffee each in the morning, or after a great meal, consider investing in a French press. It isn’t much more expensive than the average coffeepot, and it makes a great cup of coffee. Another thing you should consider when making a pot of coffee is how the coffee is treated after it brews. If the pot sits on a hot burner and stews, the first cup might be fine, but the last will be bitter and downright nasty. Invest in a thermal carafe, and pour your coffee into it immediately after it is brewed, so that it doesn’t continue to “cook” on a burner. Some coffee makers now come with a thermal carafe, letting you brew the best coffee with one purchase. I haven’t tried any of the “pod” coffee makers, but I wouldn’t recommend them for the sole reason that the coffee is already ground, and you don’t know how long it has been that way, sealed or not. French presses are easy to use, but usually only make two cups or mugs, and should be gently washed immediately. Leave the percolators to your grandmother (even if you are a grandmother!) and your church’s kitchen. And for your information, re-heating coffee in a microwave oven breaks some of the chemical bonds in the brewed coffee, and leaves you with a much less tasty drink.

If the pot sits on a hot burner and stews, the first cup might be fine, but the last will be bitter and downright nasty. Invest in a thermal carafe, and pour your coffee into it immediately after it is brewed, so that it doesn’t continue to “cook” on a burner. Some coffee makers now come with a thermal carafe, letting you brew the best coffee with one purchase. I haven’t tried any of the “pod” coffee makers, but I wouldn’t recommend them for the sole reason that the coffee is already ground, and you don’t know how long it has been that way, sealed or not. French presses are easy to use, but usually only make two cups or mugs, and should be gently washed immediately. Leave the percolators to your grandmother (even if you are a grandmother!) and your church’s kitchen. And for your information, re-heating coffee in a microwave oven breaks some of the chemical bonds in the brewed coffee, and leaves you with a much less tasty drink.

French presses are easy to use, but usually only make two cups or mugs, and should be gently washed immediately. Leave the percolators to your grandmother (even if you are a grandmother!) and your church’s kitchen. And for your information, re-heating coffee in a microwave oven breaks some of the chemical bonds in the brewed coffee, and leaves you with a much less tasty drink.

The amount of coffee you use in your pot is rather subjective; some people like “Norwegian coffee,” popular here in North Dakota, which is generally pale enough to see through. Need I say that this is not the best way to brew coffee? When I lived in Nevada, I was introduced to “Cowboy Coffee,” where coffee and water are put in the same pot and boiled. They say it’s done when a spoon will stand right up in a cup of it. Personally, I’m not partial to coffee I need to strain through my teeth. One rule of thumb you may find helpful is one tablespoon per cup, plus one for the pot.

Remember, though, that I am talking about an 8 ounce measured “cup” of water to start with, not the mugful that most of us drink. An 8-cup coffee-maker usually makes 6 mugs, but it still needs 8 tablespoons of coffee, plus one for the pot. If you cut your morning brew in half, cut that extra tablespoonful for the pot in half, too. Many people find that they prefer a little more or a little less coffee in their pot.

We’re almost done. One last piece of equipment I have yet to mention in detail is the cup. Whether you use a fine bone china cup with a delicate handle, or a sturdy stoneware mug, it should be hot before you put coffee in it. The best way to do this is to use a warming oven, if it won’t hurt your china, or to fill the cup with boiling water while the coffee is brewing, then empty it before you pour out that perfect cup of joe. Add cream (or milk, if you’re dieting) and sugar to taste, or take it straight, but if you follow my rules, you’ll always have a great cup of coffee.

 

Coffee connoisseurs love nothing more than a cup of freshly brewed coffee. There was a time when getting the best beans and roasting them at home was not possible for everyone. With the advent of sophisticated coffee machines, it is now possible for everyone roast the coffee in the comfort of their homes. But there’s still the problem of getting the best beans. Not everyone is aware or has experience on how to buy the best coffee beans.

If you love your coffee and love to roast the beans at home then you need to find best beans. Coffee beans are of different types depending on their grade and the place where they were grown. Another factor that affects the coffee taste is the freshness of the beans. You must buy the freshest beans and not the ones that have been stored in a warehouse for number of years.

While buying coffee beans, the first thing you must look for is their grade and the place where they were grown. The most popular and commonly available beans are Costa Rican Tarrazu, Kenya AA, Guatemalan Antigua, Ethiopian Yirgacheffe, Brazilian Santos, Sumatra Mandheling, Mexican Altura, Jamaican Blue Mountain, Colombian Supremo and Tanzanian Peaberry. All these beans are rich in aroma and flavour and are named after the place where they were grown. The taste differs and depends on the climate, soil and height at which the beans were grown. If you are not familiar with all the bean types, you may want to try them at your local café.

The next thing you must decide is the place that you want to buy your beans from. If you have a local store selling coffee beans near your place, you can visit it to see the different types of beans available and judge their freshness. However if you do not have a good store near the place where you live, you can order the beans on the internet. The only problem with this approach is that you wouldn’t be able to judge the freshness until the beans have arrived. So you must do some research and order from a website or online store that has good reputation. You can find the reviews and ratings in popular review sites and coffee related forums.

Finally you must decide the quantity that you want to buy. Generally you would get a discount if you buy a bigger pack. If you are familiar with the types of beans that you want to buy, go for a bigger pack such as 5 pounds to take advantage of lower price. However if you want to try a new flavor, you may want to play it safe and order a much smaller pack of say one pound to start with.

Coffee has become a daily part of my life. It’s certainly a part of the morning I most look forward to. I don’t drink coffee for the jolt of energy it tends to give you. I love coffee because I love the way it tastes. I enjoy going out to have coffee, but love to make it at home. It’s much more economical. If made right, it can taste just like the kind you get at that fancy coffee shop or even at a Starbucks. The secret is to always use cold filtered water. Trust me it really does make a big difference. Here are a few of my favorite brands in no particular order that I recommend trying.

Tully’s Coffee – When my husband and I visited Seattle, we had to stop by the Tully’s factory there. That’s when I tried my first cup. I was a fan from then on. I purchased several bags of their coffee and was making it every day until we ran out. Years later, we still buy this coffee. I’ve always seen it available at my local grocery stores and I usually buy their House Blend. It’s so smooth and creamy and it tastes just like I had it in Seattle. It always brings me back.

Seattle’s Best Coffee – I guess Seattle really is known for making great coffee. I’ve been drinking this for years and it’s delicious. My favorite is their breakfast blend. It has such a smooth flavor and is very aromatic. It almost has a slight sweetness to it that I really enjoy. The bright red bag is easy to spot in the store and is usually reasonably priced.

Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf – Their packaged coffee is delicious. Brew according to the instructions and you are guaranteed a great cup of coffee. I always get their house blend. This is such a wonderful tasting coffee. There’s so much great flavor.

Peet’s coffee – This coffee is probably one of the most expensive that I’ve listed here, but so totally worth it. You will be stunned at how delicious it is and it packs in so much great flavor. I don’t buy it too often, but when I do, I’m always excited to have that first cup.

I know these are all big brand coffees, but out of the ones I’ve tried, there’s no comparison. They are more expensive, because they really do taste wonderful. If you follow the directions on the bag, you will get a perfect brew of coffee every time.

After some unexpected vet and medical bills last fall, I decided I needed to tighten up my budget. I realized that my daily stops for coffee were an unnecessary expense, especially when I realized that my daily $3 cup was adding up to a monthly $90 deficit to my bank account. So, I started exploring options that would allow me to still enjoy my coffee while saving money too.

Option 1: Drink the Free Coffee at Work

I liked the price. A lot. Free coffee at work is a great benefit. However, the Styrofoam cups and the quality of the brews just didn’t satisfy me, and I felt deprived.

Price per cup: free

Enjoyment factor: 2/10

Option 2: Brew Ground Coffee at Home

I decided the next step was to start making my own coffee at home and bringing it to work. I’d bought a French press last summer and decided to start using it, along with a cute 16 ounce travel mug I’d picked up but never actually used.

I noticed that certain brands of coffee go on sale on a regular basis. Not only do they go on sale, you can also find coupons for .50 to $2.00 off. I picked up a large tub of ground coffee (from a popular manufacturer) for $4.00. And that coffee lasted me for about a month. However, it didn’t brew well in my French press, and I will admit that I’d sometimes discard the homemade coffee and pull into the first coffee shop I found on the way to work.

Price per cup: about .13

Enjoyment factor: 5/10

Option 3: Grind and Brew Coffee at Home

I got a coffee grinder and a bag of coffee beans for Christmas, and I was instantly pleased with the improved taste of my homebrewed coffee in my French Press. I was a little bit scared when I saw that the price of the Starbucks Beans I wanted to buy was $7 a bag. Did that mean I was going to be paying $7 a week for coffee? Was I going backwards in my pursuit to save money?

I started to figure it out. First, I needed to figure out if I was using too much coffee in my French press. I decided could make the bag last for about two weeks, which meant my daily cost for coffee would be .50. I noticed that the bag included a coupon for a free tall coffee at Starbucks, which was a $2 value. Even without the coupon, I was still saving $2.50 a day on coffee…or $68.00 a week. Worth it? Oh yeah.

Price per cup: about .50

Enjoyment factor: 8/10

Results

The results of my experiment? I’m still buying and bringing my homebrewed coffee to work each day. I will admit that I still occasionally stop for a cup of coffee shop coffee-I just save it for an occasional treat instead of making it part of my daily routine. Overall, I believe I’m saving about $60 a month on coffee, which is a nice $720 yearly addition to my savings account.

It wasn’t a pleasant sight when I saw the rear axle bent forward, but I was sure it wasn’t so bad because he made it back home alive. The drapes were drawn but he wasn’t there, slumped on the couch, there he was, lying motionless, but breathing of course. I continued on with the broken car and blood stains on my mind while I make way to the room.

He didn’t react much and neither did he bothered to offer an excuse, I wasn’t upset but definitely displeasured. The marks on his neck were even more severe than ones made by the brunette lawyer that I caught him with last week while I was doing the chores. My tolerance is just a tick away from striking the death clock. As if the breakfast was mandatory to his soul, the silver platter is complimented with gravitational blood drops.

Philandering I can handle, It’s the fighting that I wish I could stop, but Gotham needs a hero, and our hero needs a butler and when the great light of distress is switched on to summon, its back to dusting, cleaning but mostly waiting and hoping.

If you are a fan of Starbucks coffee, but not their sky-high prices, you might want to consider making your own fancy coffee at home, for a fraction of the price. It really isn’t that difficult to do and if you have a fridge, a blender and a microwave, there is no reason you can’t do it just as quickly.

You can use instant coffee, but properly brewed always tastes better. What most people don’t know is that you can chill brewed coffee and then just reheat it later. This is ideal if you are on your own and can’t finish a whole pot by yourself, but it is also means you can have instantly cold coffee for a refreshing frappachino!

Keep a jug of coffee in the fridge and just reheat or use in a recipe as needed. You will also want to have cocoa or chocolate syrup, sugar and milk on hand, as well as cinnamon. With these few ingredients, you have the makings of a truly great coffee. Heck, go out and buy the funky cups, too, if you want, or just save a bunch of the cardboard kind from your last few Starbucks runs.

Frappaccino

Blend one cup of cold coffee with a handful of ice cubes, a quarter cup of milk and sugar to taste. Delicious.

Mochaccino

Follow the steps as given above, but add a tablespoon of chocolate syrup. Top with whipped cream, if you like.

Hot Mocha

Heat a cup of coffee in the microwave and stir in a tablespoon of chocolate syrup. Stir in a tablespoon of milk. Add sugar and top with whipped cream if desired.

Cappuccino

Heat a cup of coffee. Take a cup of chilled milk and use a mixer to froth the milk. Take a spoon and lay it on the edge of the coffee cup, with the back of the spoon up, the tip in the coffee. Gently pour the frothed milk over the back of the spoon to top up the cup. Sprinkle with cinnamon powder.

Latte

Heat a cup of coffee. Heat a cup of milk until hot, but not boiling. Use a mixer to froth the milk, and then pour it into the latte, using a spoon to keep the foam back. Finish the coffee off with a spoonful of foam.

You can also buy flavorings such as vanilla, almond, and orange and add a capful of the extract to any of the above to create your own unique flavors. Experiment until you find the coffee you enjoy most.